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Potential SCIRIC Session Topics for Orlando
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1/24/2016 at 3:08:43 PM GMT
Posts: 10
Potential SCIRIC Session Topics for Orlando

Here's Thomas' request from the email. Let's use this forum to discuss ideas for a session topic.

Alan Samel of the Orlando platform sub-committee sent to all AG chairs a call for session proposals for this year's SETAC World Congress in Orlando based on identified emerging topics. See below emails for details.
 
In a nutshell, one emerging topic was identified as "Linking Science and Social Issues", where communication fits to; especially communication to outside our ivory tower. Alan provide some extra thoughts on this topic from discussions within the Global Science Committee (see below).
@Alan: If you would like to add something, just reply to this email.
 
So, if you have a session in mind, please submit to Orlando and post here for all of us to know. Would be cool if you would announce and discuss possible sessions in the SCIRIC forum on setac.org, to initially bring it to life and fill with some activity.
 
Mind the deadline for proposals on February 24th, 2016!
 
Best, Thomas
-----------------------------------

A number of emerging topics have been identified by both the GSC and NASC that we would like the AGs to consider for platform sessions for the World Congress.  The request is for the AGs (you) to consider the identified topics, provided below, and determine if your AG would be interested in proposing a platform session.  If so, great!  If you are interested and would like to discuss further, please let me know and we can schedule something.  This is a great opportunity for the AGs, the Science Committees, and the Planning Committee to work together and put together an excellent program that is transparent and complimentary to the work we are trying to do in each AG and within other corners of SETAC.  This is part of the grand vision we discussed at the last NA SETAC meeting with the AGs and the SETAC committees that Bruce organized.  Consider this a very important and vital step in this vision.

 

The deadline for submitting a proposal is February 24.

 

Here are the emerging topics identified by the GSC and NASC.  The topics are very broad.  The specific direction of the proposal is left up to the expertise within each AG.  If you want more information or GSC/NASC insights for a specific topic, please let me know.

·         High throughput tests most predictive of in vivo hazards and working to standardize these among labs

·         Developing and using -omics methods as diagnostic tools in field settings

·         Merging diverse information across multiple levels of biological organization (from in vitro and in vivo data, read across, in silico etc) into a coherent hazard framework

·         Extrapolation of effects data across species using evolutionary conservation of biological pathways

·         Improving the characterization of the exposure-response relationship of multiple chemical stressors

·         Linking Science and Social Issues

·         Water and Water Management

·         Mixtures

·         Exposure Assessments

·         Low Dose

-----------------------------------

Here is some additional information that was put together by the Global Science Committee, for your AG consideration.

 

1.      Linking Science and Social Issues theme:  Focus on integrating human health and ecological impacts for purposes of policy making.  The Advisory Group on Sustainability (and perhaps also ERAAG and HHRA AG) would likely be willing to support something in this theme.  This could take the form of a conceptual and/or methodological type of meeting – examining ideas for how this integration could happen and where straight science vs. science/social interfaces come into play.  We could focus on a particular topic, such as energy or water or a particular “industry” such as corn/biofuels production or something else. 

2.      Science Communication – discussing and sharing communication techniques/tips/advice helpful for communicating concepts about environmental science and environmental policy making.  How do we teach/communicate with each other (scientists among disciplines) and how do we teach/communicate with others (students of all ages, K through grad school)?  E.g., How does energy policy influence energy technology so what’s important for us to know in order to reduce environmental impacts of energy technology? OR cooking is about chemistry – and physics – and math  – and let us show you how.  OR Eating organic isn’t sufficient for good environmental outcomes.  Etc.  We could focus this meeting on development of a particular idea/concept (that would be broad enough to interest many people) that SETAC members could use in their own teaching or outreach or just for their own learning experience (or to be more fun at cocktail parties!).  I’m thinking of this asThe Outreach Committee and/or other AGs might be supportive depending what specific topics and target audience are chosen. 

3.      Sustainable Development: The lack of economic resources on communities have caused that populations increased material reuse (a common practice in Mexico) and detonates recycling of valuable materials in order to increase family income at low economical class level. Small and large companies have been recycling and disposing materials to accomplish regulations, increase efficiency, and profits.  However, several issues such as technology development, impact of sustainable development on the environment and education efforts to improve are quite isolated and there is still a lot to approach and discover. 

4.      Integration of SETAC Working Groups or Workshops - SETAC has life-cycle assessment (LCA), ecosystem service (ESS) and sustainability working groups, but they often seem to be working in parallel universes with not enough cross-talk.  The LCA community has considered ESS approaches for some impact categories, such as water use.  However, these are not mature approaches, and methodologies applied mostly require monetization of the service flows, limiting the consideration of some less easily quantifiable ESS, possibly choosing precision at the cost of breadth and relevance.  As LCA rapidly advances, it is important to ensure that quantitation of these "first past the post" parameters does not marginalise more problematic parameters.  Sustainability assessments, for example those looking at Green and Sustainable Remediation, are providing insights into a better balance between social, economic and ecological issues, but would benefit from ESS and LCA approaches to help define and quantify links between these separated, but inter-dependant “pillars”. A recent joint ecosystem services and Sustainability advisory groups special session on the sustainability of Mediterranean Olive Oil production concluded that LCA, which tends to focus mainly on negative impacts per unit production, does not allow for a consideration of many essential regulating, supporting, cultural and spiritual services that more traditional olive groves provide, possibly encouraging and supporting destructive and unsustainable practices. Ultimately, the conclusion was that there was a need for ESS thinking to help society decide what services it wants to sustain, sustainability thinking to define the social/economic and ecological values and (adapted) LCA thinking to evaluate the cradle-to-grave impacts of processes, policies and decisions.  Together, these are powerful tools to help society decide how to manage land- and water-scapes to sustain the services they value, but they provide different viewpoints of a multi-dimensional reality. There is a need for integrated working groups or workshops to provide the tools to move across these frameworks and approaches, identifying the languages, tools and points of connection that will better allow these to be complementary, rather than competing, fields.

    1. Minamata Convention - the UN Minamata Convention on Mercury is a globally legally binding instrument signed by 100 countries (including US, Canada, Mexico).  Moving ahead, countries need to develop national action plans which include programs aimed at biomonitoring biotic and abiotic indicators.  In recent years, at SETAC and in associated journals, there have been presentations and publications on how exactly to do so.  A focused meeting on this topic may help develop some consensus on the matter and thus help guide government agencies and officials in implementing the Convention.

Alan Samel of the Orlando platform sub-committee sent to all AG chairs a call for session proposals for this year's SETAC World Congress in Orlando based on identified emerging topics. See below emails for details.
 
In a nutshell, one emerging topic was identified as "Linking Science and Social Issues", where communication fits to; especially communication to outside our ivory tower. Alan provide some extra thoughts on this topic from discussions within the Global Science Committee (see below).
@Alan: If you would like to add something, just reply to this email.
 
So, if you have a session in mind, please submit to Orlando and post here for all of us to know. Would be cool if you would announce and discuss possible sessions in the SCIRIC forum on setac.org, to initially bring it to life and fill with some activity.
 
Mind the deadline for proposals on February 24th, 2016!
 
Best, Thomas
-----------------------------------

A number of emerging topics have been identified by both the GSC and NASC that we would like the AGs to consider for platform sessions for the World Congress.  The request is for the AGs (you) to consider the identified topics, provided below, and determine if your AG would be interested in proposing a platform session.  If so, great!  If you are interested and would like to discuss further, please let me know and we can schedule something.  This is a great opportunity for the AGs, the Science Committees, and the Planning Committee to work together and put together an excellent program that is transparent and complimentary to the work we are trying to do in each AG and within other corners of SETAC.  This is part of the grand vision we discussed at the last NA SETAC meeting with the AGs and the SETAC committees that Bruce organized.  Consider this a very important and vital step in this vision.

 

The deadline for submitting a proposal is February 24.

 

Here are the emerging topics identified by the GSC and NASC.  The topics are very broad.  The specific direction of the proposal is left up to the expertise within each AG.  If you want more information or GSC/NASC insights for a specific topic, please let me know.

·         High throughput tests most predictive of in vivo hazards and working to standardize these among labs

·         Developing and using -omics methods as diagnostic tools in field settings

·         Merging diverse information across multiple levels of biological organization (from in vitro and in vivo data, read across, in silico etc) into a coherent hazard framework

·         Extrapolation of effects data across species using evolutionary conservation of biological pathways

·         Improving the characterization of the exposure-response relationship of multiple chemical stressors

·         Linking Science and Social Issues

·         Water and Water Management

·         Mixtures

·         Exposure Assessments

·         Low Dose

-----------------------------------

Here is some additional information that was put together by the Global Science Committee, for your AG consideration.

 

1.      Linking Science and Social Issues theme:  Focus on integrating human health and ecological impacts for purposes of policy making.  The Advisory Group on Sustainability (and perhaps also ERAAG and HHRA AG) would likely be willing to support something in this theme.  This could take the form of a conceptual and/or methodological type of meeting – examining ideas for how this integration could happen and where straight science vs. science/social interfaces come into play.  We could focus on a particular topic, such as energy or water or a particular “industry” such as corn/biofuels production or something else. 

2.      Science Communication – discussing and sharing communication techniques/tips/advice helpful for communicating concepts about environmental science and environmental policy making.  How do we teach/communicate with each other (scientists among disciplines) and how do we teach/communicate with others (students of all ages, K through grad school)?  E.g., How does energy policy influence energy technology so what’s important for us to know in order to reduce environmental impacts of energy technology? OR cooking is about chemistry – and physics – and math  – and let us show you how.  OR Eating organic isn’t sufficient for good environmental outcomes.  Etc.  We could focus this meeting on development of a particular idea/concept (that would be broad enough to interest many people) that SETAC members could use in their own teaching or outreach or just for their own learning experience (or to be more fun at cocktail parties!).  I’m thinking of this asThe Outreach Committee and/or other AGs might be supportive depending what specific topics and target audience are chosen. 

3.      Sustainable Development: The lack of economic resources on communities have caused that populations increased material reuse (a common practice in Mexico) and detonates recycling of valuable materials in order to increase family income at low economical class level. Small and large companies have been recycling and disposing materials to accomplish regulations, increase efficiency, and profits.  However, several issues such as technology development, impact of sustainable development on the environment and education efforts to improve are quite isolated and there is still a lot to approach and discover. 

4.      Integration of SETAC Working Groups or Workshops - SETAC has life-cycle assessment (LCA), ecosystem service (ESS) and sustainability working groups, but they often seem to be working in parallel universes with not enough cross-talk.  The LCA community has considered ESS approaches for some impact categories, such as water use.  However, these are not mature approaches, and methodologies applied mostly require monetization of the service flows, limiting the consideration of some less easily quantifiable ESS, possibly choosing precision at the cost of breadth and relevance.  As LCA rapidly advances, it is important to ensure that quantitation of these "first past the post" parameters does not marginalise more problematic parameters.  Sustainability assessments, for example those looking at Green and Sustainable Remediation, are providing insights into a better balance between social, economic and ecological issues, but would benefit from ESS and LCA approaches to help define and quantify links between these separated, but inter-dependant “pillars”. A recent joint ecosystem services and Sustainability advisory groups special session on the sustainability of Mediterranean Olive Oil production concluded that LCA, which tends to focus mainly on negative impacts per unit production, does not allow for a consideration of many essential regulating, supporting, cultural and spiritual services that more traditional olive groves provide, possibly encouraging and supporting destructive and unsustainable practices. Ultimately, the conclusion was that there was a need for ESS thinking to help society decide what services it wants to sustain, sustainability thinking to define the social/economic and ecological values and (adapted) LCA thinking to evaluate the cradle-to-grave impacts of processes, policies and decisions.  Together, these are powerful tools to help society decide how to manage land- and water-scapes to sustain the services they value, but they provide different viewpoints of a multi-dimensional reality. There is a need for integrated working groups or workshops to provide the tools to move across these frameworks and approaches, identifying the languages, tools and points of connection that will better allow these to be complementary, rather than competing, fields.

    1. Minamata Convention - the UN Minamata Convention on Mercury is a globally legally binding instrument signed by 100 countries (including US, Canada, Mexico).  Moving ahead, countries need to develop national action plans which include programs aimed at biomonitoring biotic and abiotic indicators.  In recent years, at SETAC and in associated journals, there have been presentations and publications on how exactly to do so.  A focused meeting on this topic may help develop some consensus on the matter and thus help guide government agencies and officials in implementing the Convention.


1/24/2016 at 3:14:06 PM GMT
Posts: 10
IDEA: Communication in times of public health or environmental crises

With the Flint Water Crisis hitting national and international news in the last month, I began thinking a lot about how science and policy are communicated to communities in times of public health or environmental emergencies. What have we learned from previous crises and how can we use this knowledge to be more effective in the future? 

Do we think we can rally significant support around this theme? Can we modify it to be more broad reaching? I'd love to hear other SCIRIC members' ideas! Please share on this forum.



2/4/2016 at 3:50:17 PM GMT
Posts: 12
Hi Sarah, nice idea. This session could present cases, more like stories, not so much studies. That's a promising approach. From the past sessions we know that the real research on communication is either very limited or not commonly presented at SETAC AMs. Different with cases. The first session in Berlin 2012 opened with a case of communication failure, and its still one of the best presentations we've seen at our sessions. With cases we could also find more people having experience with communication and add to our network. Expertise seems scarce within SETAC - or people do not like to share.


2/4/2016 at 3:57:15 PM GMT
Posts: 12
Hi all, in a further reply on Sarah's idea and my thoughts on that: What other types or "cases" could make up for a nice session? As outlined, cases might be the best way to yield contributions. Many members can probably tell a story, but only few have real expertise. Let's collect here!


2/4/2016 at 4:03:58 PM GMT
Posts: 12
And me again. Maybe one way forward would be to propose a special session. These are allowed to be organised rather flexible, not necessarily containing only platform talks, but could include a panel discussion, a workshop, group working formats like world café or brainstorming, etc. What do you think?


2/4/2016 at 4:20:01 PM GMT
Posts: 12
Session on communication from research projects (yes, again)

IDEA: Another session on communication and dissemination activities from past, ongoing and proposed research projects

We had a similar topic already in the past (Barcelona 2015), and not so many abstracts were submitted to that session. However, even though I just posted that it is difficult to find the - maybe only few - experts on communication within SETAC, this is one important part of our working programme. And everything we can learn about such activities is an addition to the inventory of tools/concepts/strategies/ideas for communication that we aim to build up, improve and tailor for environmental research.

This time I would extend the call to project proposals. Communication and dissemination became very important for research projects, and a description of concepts is mandatory for many fundings (I know about German DFG and BMBF, EU H202o). Hence, most of the currently prepared or already submitted proposal include details on communication and dissemination. I would like to retrieve this treasure.



2/23/2016 at 3:29:36 PM GMT
Posts: 12
Session proposal for Orlando submitted
Hi SCIRIC! This is to remind you that the session proposal deadline is tomorrow (24th). Also, I would like to inform you that Leonie and I just submitted the following proposal:

Ideas and concepts for dissemination and communication of research findings in times of Open Science and Science 2.0

Thomas-Benjamin Seiler and Leonie Nüßer

With this session we want to retrieve a treasure: all the valuable ideas and concepts for dissemination and communication of research findings. They are deeply buried in running projects, in projects that are about to start, and in project proposals – also those that were unsuccessful.

Nowadays, most project proposals need to describe how findings from the research project will be disseminated and communicated. Here, dissemination means to let your peers know about your results, while communication describes the process of interacting with target audiences in the public. The EU framework programme Horizon 2020 includes both as a mandatory aspect, and same holds true for the European Joint Programming Initiative (JPI). Many other national and international funding schemes more and more emphasize the relevance of dissemination and communication activities as an essential part of today’s scientific research. As a concept behind this, Open Science becomes popular: the idea to share, to make accessible, to participate.

Science 2.0 is Open Science using modern communication technology. With this, the possibilities to tell the scientific community, decision makers, the mass media as well as the general public about important findings have massively changed. Do you know all possible ways to convey meaningful information from environmental research, beyond press releases and radio interviews? Are you familiar with Facebook and Twitter, with Altmetric? Are you using publons, PubPeer and ResearchGate? Are you aware of figshare and JournalReview? Do you submit to PeerJ and eLife? 

We have a wealth of tools and opportunities at hand; more than anyone of us could ever use or even overlook. But many scientists within SETAC already work with a subset of these tools – not only the technological. This session intends to collect these subsets just like tiles of a larger puzzle that depicts a world of established, of new and overall fascinating ways to interact with your peers and audiences outside science.

Come to Orlando, share your ideas and show your concepts. Discuss with the audience about how modern technology changes the way science gets disseminated and communicated. You do not have to be an expert on communication, you only should have a good idea how you would like to do it – and put it in a presentation or on a poster. The audience can give you valuable input on how to further improve your ideas and concepts for the benefit of your research projects.


4/11/2016 at 8:46:03 PM GMT
Posts: 12
Hi all, good news from here! Our session was selected for the call for abstracts and we are also listed as a proposed spotlight session. I will send an invitation to submit an abstract the next days via the SCIRIC group mailing. But if you know of people who you think could contribute, or want to contribute yourself, then be aware that abstract submission is already open and the deadline is 8 June.

@Sarah: How about your session, is it also in the call?
@All: Anybody else who successfully submitted a session proposal?


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